Tuesday, February 03, 2009

Disbudding Baby Goats


Several have ask what disbudding is and why we do it. Here is a post I wrote last year that should answer your questions. If you have more just leave a comment and I will answer them for you. http://hiddenhavenhomestead.blogspot.com/2008/08/this-and-that.html

12 comments:

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Thanks Peggy. I knew what dis-budding was --and why you have to do it.. But--I know it kills you having to hurt those babies... Thank goodness it only happens once.

Thanks for sharing..
Hugs,
Betsy

Raggedy Girl said...

OUCH!!! Poor babies. But we do things to our babies to keep them healthy too. Thanks for showing us.
Roberta Anne

Brenda said...

Thanks for your kind words and prayers.

Amy said...

We used to not be able to watch the disbudding process but now we have watched it done by our vet.

Stephanie said...

We leave ours with horns on. But we had to disbud two this year b/c they are going to the fair with our children, and the fair rules say no horns. It really wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. It only seemed to hurt for a moment.

Rosa said...

I can't bear it!!!!!

Barbara said...

Disbudding is much worse than worming, I stated before we don't, but I understand why you do.
Have a great day.

ChristyACB said...

Wow, I'm not sure I would be able to do it, but I sure do understand better why you do it. Thanks for the explanation.

I do suppose a few minutes of pain is far better than having your head stuck in a fence all night and freezing!

Shiloh Prairie Farm said...

That is one thing I like about the meat goats, they don't have to be disbudded to be shown. I know people are working in close proximity more with dairy goats so I can understand the reason but it always seemed strange how different the breed association's views on horns are between meat goats and dairy goats. One thing is for sure, those ones that like to get their head stuck, never learn...you would think they would think "hey...the last time I did this I was stuck here awhile", but they don't. We have electric fence so it isn't a problem here except in the feed pen & I just shut them out of there except when I am feeding them.

Mandie said...

Poor things! But I would do the same thing, it is the safest thing for them and the owners. Now I really want a goat!!! Soooo precious

DayPhoto said...

We have to de-horn our calves. Well, not always, we are breeding more and more into the polled types.

But, my story is one time when I was helping we were working on an hystrical 'girl' she was really throwing a fit, etc. so I talked Terry into stopping.

Not good. She grew a crooked horn on one side that broke off (it was weak) and then regrew a wee bit. We called her One-Horn although her birth name was Blackie. My fault. She would have been better off if we had just finished the job.

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

Mrs.Ruiz said...

That makes me sad:( Poor babies.